Data Security News Headlines 16th July, 2016

  1. Ubuntu Linux forum hacked! Once again

The Ubuntu online forums have been hacked, and data belonging to over 2 Million users have been compromised, Canonical just announced. The compromised users’ data include their IP addresses, usernames, and email addresses, according to the company, who failed to apply a patch to secure its users’ data.  However, users should keep in mind that the hack did not affect the Ubuntu operating system, or it was not due to a vulnerability or weakness in the OS. Instead, the breach only affected the Ubuntu online forums that people use to discuss the OS, said BetaNews, who initially reported the news. “There has been a security breach on the Ubuntu Forums site,” Jane Silber, Chief Executive Officer at Canonical. Corrective action has been taken, and full service of the Forums has been restored.

What the attacker could access: Attacker able to inject certain formatted SQL to the Forums database, can read the table entries such as username, email id, IP but not able to read password.

What the attacker could not access:  Attacker not able to access any Ubuntu code repository, valid passwords, no SQL remote access, not able to access front end server and  not able to access any Ubuntu service.

Cyber Security Tips:  User need to change their passwords, use IP security, Ubuntu need to check for vulnerabilities if any, use more security to protect forum.

  1. Microsoft Wins! Government can’t force tech companies to hand over data stored overseas

The US government has powers to comply US-based tech companies with the court orders to hand over their customers’ data stored on servers, even if the data centers are beyond US borders. Now, the recent court decision has proven that the data centers and servers located outside the US boundaries are safe haven. The Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York ruled Thursday that the United States government cannot force tech companies to give the FBI or other federal authorities access to their non-US customers’ data stored on servers located in other countries. The Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York ruled Thursday that the United States government cannot force tech companies to give the FBI or other federal authorities access to their non-US customers’ data stored on servers located in other countries.

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